What to See in Victoria Square

Victoria Square is a famous public square in the city of Adelaide. Also known as Tarntanyangga, it is home to some of the city’s most prestigious buildings. It sits at the centre of Adelaide’s grid-like structure and is bordered by a number of important edifices, including the Supreme Court of South Australia, the old Treasury building, and the General Post Office.

To the east of the square, you’ll find the Roman Catholic Cathedral Church of St Francis Xavier and the State Government offices, while to the west, there are a selection of commercial buildings, like the Adelaide Central Market and the Hilton Hotel.

The History of Victoria Square

There is a firm link between Victoria Square and the local Aboriginal people, as it was once the place for special ceremonies and dances. Tarndanyangaa, as it is known in Aboriginal, marks the headquarters of the Dundagunya tribe and, in the 1960s, the community began using the square for cultural activities once again.

What to See in Victoria Square

Queen Victoria Statue Queen Victoria Statue

At the heart of the square, you’ll find the imposing Queen Victoria statue which was based on a model by C. B. Birch. It was specially made from Wallaroo and Moonta copper and has been an important part of the square since 1894.

Reconciliation Plaza

The road connecting Grote and Wakefield Streets was renamed Reconciliation Plaza in 2013. Today, it is home to two flagpoles that fly both the Australian National Flag and the Aboriginal Flag.

The State Survey Mark

Set to the north of the square, the State Survey Mark is a reminder of the placing of the first peg for the Adelaide’s city survey back in 1837.

Three Rivers Fountain in Victoria Square

Now set in the southern end of the square after it was relocated from the north, the Three Rivers Fountain has been in its current home since 2014. It was built to commemorate Queen Elizabeth II’s visit to Adelaide in the 60s. The sculpture is by John Dowie, and boasts a crown at the centre to represent the royal visit while the fountain represents the three rivers that flow in and around Adelaide.

Victoria Square is an important part of daily life in Adelaide, whether it’s as a meeting place for locals or because of its selection of important and imposing buildings. Its historic charm is well worth checking out, particularly if you want to see modern day Australia working alongside the Australia of times gone by.